Explore OpenStreetMap Statistics

OSM Stats for Namibia

Ever wanted to explore OSM statistics over time and in depth? OSM Stats is for you. Notice the site asks for your location – this is just to show you your country automagically by default.

The site lets you explore by country, over time, major types of OSM data. The left-hand graph shows you the aggregate count over time, the right-hand graph shows the difference (delta) over the same time period. You can click different data types on the left, change country at the top, and change the time range just above the graphs.

You can find some interesting things. Here’s the default view for the United Kingdom:

What it shows is data growing over time. We like graphs that go up-and-to-the-right. The right-hand graph shows, as expected, the amount of data being added declining over time. This is because there’s less and less to map in the UK as I started the project there.

Compare that to Haiti:

Can you guess what the spikes in data addition are?

Now look at residential roads only in the United States:

Things are declining over time! Where are all those residential roads going? Well a small part of the answer (notice the vertical axis is 2 orders of magnitude less than above) is the growth of living streets in the US:

That’s a small taste of the things you can learn – have fun exploring the site and email me any comments.


OpenStreetView Canada Talks Next Week

If you’re in Calgary, I’ll be speaking about OpenStreetView on Tuesday next week at MapTime Calgary!

Then on Thursday I’ll be at OpenStreetMap Ottawa too!

If you’re around, drop me a line.


OpenGeoCodes iOS and Android Apps – Collect Open Address Data

Open Address data from OpenGeoCodes in Durango, CO. Green pins are manually verified, red are awaiting verification.

Open Address data from OpenGeoCodes in Durango, CO. Green pins are manually verified, red are awaiting verification.

screen696x696OpenGeoCodes now has iOS and Android apps to optimize the hand collection of addresses.

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Addresses are the primary limiting factor of OpenStreetMap – there just isn’t much out there that’s easily licensed and OSM itself for a variety of reasons lacks address data. OSM looks pretty – it’s a great display map. It’s also routable with a lot of work. But, you can’t find addresses on it.

OpenGeoCodes has data in the US and some starter data in Canada and the UK to try to fix this.

So what do the apps do?

The apps let you walk around and collect data. Say you’re standing outside 100 Main Street – just tap it, the app records the location and you’re done. Normally the app tries to guess where you are based on location.

But wait, there’s more! As you walk along, the app will optimize what addresses to show you. For example if you’re walking on the even side of a street going north, the app will figure this out and present you ascending even numbers. So if you enter 100 and 102, and the app knows 104 is nearby it will focus on this.

This makes it easy to walk along and just tap, tap, tap to collect data. We collect this data together and then make it freely downloadable. There’s also a mailing list if you want to get involved.

Where to from here? The feature list includes a more human design, notifications for when near places with no data, OSM upload and fixing and more. Drop me an email if you run in to any issues.

 


Connecting WordPress to OpenStreetMap with Auth0

If you log in to this blog you can now do so using your OSM account. If I say so myself, that’s pretty awesome. Here’s how I did it:

First we need to install the Auth0 WordPress Plugin which you can find by opening up WP, going to plugins and searching for “Auth0.”

Auth0 is just fantastically awesome. It’s a service which allows you to login to anything using anything. For example, you have a rails project and want to log in using facebook. Or you have a Node project and you want to log in using Active Directory. Or in our case, WordPress and log in using OSM. Auth0 is very extensible and developer friendly. For example, there are arbitrary JS events that fire through the login process. You can have twilio send you an SMS when someone logs in as an example.

Another way I like to think about it is like this: It used to be that you’d write a PHP app with JS front end and SQL backend. What Ruby on Rails did is meld together SQL and Ruby so now you only need to learn two things (Ruby and JS). You didn’t have to write SQL as well. Now things like meteor are removing even that so you just write JS everywhere. In a similar way – the first thing you do when you make an app is usually go build your login system. No more! Just use Auth0 and avoid all that pain. Auth0 is going to be more secure than anything you do, and immediately extensible.

Once you’ve installed your WP plugin, head over to the connection API Explorer.  Most things in your Auth0 dashboard are trivial you just turn them on and off like this:Capture

But OSMs authentication API isn’t this easy for a number of reasons. First, it uses OAuth 1.0(a) and Auth0 support version 2 out of the box as a thing on the dashboard. Second, OSM still uses XML where the rest of the world has moved on to JSON.

But it still works! We just need to use the Auth0 connection API to create a connection.

Next you need to log in to OSM. Click on your user at the top right, click settings, click OAuth settings, and create a OAuth Client. More docs are here. Once you have a OAuth app set up on OSM, you will get your client id and secret you can use with the code below.

On the Auth0 dashboard, create an application (applications -> create) and note down the client ID and secret.

On the API page, create a token with connections:create with the token generator at the top left – this lets you create new connections straight from the browser:

Capture2You also want to create a token with all the permissions around the following: clients (create and update), connections (create, read and update), rules (create and delete) and users (create, read and update). Note down this token, as the Auth0 WP plugin will need it.

Next we need to paste some code in to the box marked “body”:

Remember to enter your ID and secret. Now click the “Try” button and you should get a “201” response that the connection was created.

So now we need to hook this up to the Auth0 login box (called the “lock”). Back on your wordpress site, go to the Auth0 plugin, settings, basic. Here enter your client ID and secret from when you made the application in the Auth0 dashboard. Also add the API token you created with all those permissions and click save. Next go to the advanced settings and enter the following in the CSS box:

And then this in the JS box:

We need to do this to add the button on the login box for OSM. Lastly, go back to your Auth0 dashboard and the app you created. You’ll need to add a line in “Allowed Callback URLs ” which will be unique for your site, but for my blog it’s this: http://stevecoast.com/index.php?auth0=1

That should be it, now users can log in using OSM:

Capture3Notice that I’ve turned on facebook, GitHub and so on… and a the end there’s the OSM logo. Click it and you can login with OSM!

Of course, now you’ve done this it means you can connect an iOS application, your webapp or anything else to OSM in the same way. Magic.


Rochester, NY

I’m speaking at the GIS/SIG 25th Annual Spatial/Digital Mapping Conference on April 12, 2016, see you there!


New Year, New Roles

It’s been a wild two-and-a-half years at Telenav helping bring OpenStreetMap to the consumer. We shipped consumer turn-by-turn navigation in the US with Scout which was for me a big first – a turning point of showing OSMs true potential.

As the OSM project at Telenav has grown the need for the visionary founder has shifted and I’m stepping back from full-time work at Telenav. I’ll be still helping part-time and helping with new projects going forward. 2016 is going to be a fun year with a great team at Telenav (including all the bright folks we brought in from Skobbler) and I know they’ll continue to push out more OSM goodness.


New Kickstarter: Every Road

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I have a new kickstarter live now: Every Road! Every Road is a unique poster print of every road leading away from your house (or any other point). Above you see the bay area, driving away from the Ferry Building at the NE of San Francisco. Here’s the same thing driving away from a point in the Sunset:

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The roads get thinner as you go and lead to a tree-like structure. Each print is totally unique to you. Here’s driving away from Buckingham Palace in London:

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Here’s walking everywhere from Wall Street in Manhattan. Notice most route on Manhattan end up walking North and branch out across each side:

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Here’s the same thing, but driving:

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Notice how it leads to a totally different map because driving leads to quicker routes along the edge of Manhattan and then driving inward to each point. As opposed to walking, where your maximum speed doesn’t change depending on what road you’re walking on.

The data of course comes from OpenStreetMap, more details are at the Every Road kickstarter!


The Book of OSM, now available!

bookThe Book of OSM is now shipping on Amazon Kindle and in paperback (uk, de)!

This book contains 15 interviews conducted by OSM founder Steve Coast with the people who were there as the project began and grew. Starting in 2004, the interviews trace how a rag tag collection of volunteers was able to produce a map which compares in quality to maps produced by multi-billion dollar corporations. Learn how such an ambitious project got started and then succeeded at mapping the world, for free!

The book was the result of a kickstarter that raised just under $10k.


Book of OSM Review Proof

The Book of OSM is shipping very soon. Fifteen interviews with key people around OSM from when it started to today – you can sign up to be notified when it ships here. Here’s the physical review proof:

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The Book of OSM – nearly available

My kickstarter project for the book of OSM is nearly done. Kickstarter backers already have the PDF of the book: The contents are final and the cover has some bugs being fixed:

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Notice the white lines on the back cover. Once that is done, it’ll be available on Amazon.com and Kindle. If you want to stay up to date, there is a mailing list on the website for the book.